"...we should pass over all biographies of 'the good and the great,' while we search carefully the slight records of wretches who died in prison, in Bedlam, or upon the gallows."
~Edgar Allan Poe

Friday, September 16, 2016

Weekend Link Dump



This week's Link Dump is sponsored by the Confederacy of the Bookplate Cats!








Where the hell is Atlantis?  This Italian scientist thinks he knows.

Where the hell is HMS Terror?  Now we think we know.

Who the hell killed James Garfield?  This author thinks he knows, and the murderer may not have been who you think it was.

What the hell is this Neolithic stone?

What the hell was the Loomis Street Affair?

England's first Wicked Stepmother.

A murder mystery with an inconclusive ending.

The secret diary of an 18th century planter.  Read the excerpts and you'll see why it was secret.

Some etiquette tips if you're ever transported to the 18th century.

The Clock Bewitcher.

The ultimate cure for rheumatism.

The Mitford Sisters, the Kardashians for the intellectual set.

The battle over Nefertiti.

Canada's role in the Louisiana Purchase.

Dog-grooming in 19th century high society.

9,000 year old Australian homes.

A Scottish "Physic Well."

Medieval recycling.

A Brownstone for your favorite hipster cat.

The first attempt at optography.

This week's "Well, duh!" moment: It's finally dawned on scientists that dolphins have a language.

The biggest witch trial in history.

The top American folktales.

A Series of Unfortunate 1843 Events.

A doomed Rat Utopia.

That time someone wanted to drain the Mediterranean.

A look at some megalithic tombs.

Re-evaluating the Black Prince.

Some WWI dowsing.

The life of an 18th century courtesan and spy.

The world's oldest snowshoe.

Another one for the "Our Ancient Ancestors Were a Lot Smarter Than We Think" file.

A bad landlord leads to a family tragedy.

Living on the fringes of Empire.

Visions of the American flag.

Particularly strange cases of missing children.

Anyone else up for booking a room in a haunted lighthouse?

The Case of the Howling Queen.

Some French animal tales.

How to lose a 137-carat diamond.

A magistrate's extremely colorful casebook.

An 18th century Zelig.

An interesting experiment testing the power of mind over our bodies.

Poisons and love potions.

This week's Advice From Thomas Morris:  Beware the snake poo salesmen.

Also, what not to do with pins.

A British MP puts in the ultimate overtime.

More about fortune-telling with moles.

Cows and the full moon.

The Shaman's Apprentice.

An early Northern Ireland UFO sighting?

Is there a secret message in the Sistine Chapel?

A place where a very peculiar woman thinks the world is falling apart and surrounds herself with cats because she thinks they're gods.  Despite what you're assuming, this is not a profile of Strange Company HQ.

An ill-fated Duke of Burgundy.

Why we all love black pigs.

The death of a prostrated pirate.

A case of "Second Sound."

How to raise a genius.

A French Court of Miracles.

A guide to eloping.

Bird trees and barnacle geese.

This week in Russian Weird:  This one's for anyone out there nursing a delusion that life under the Soviets was fun and games.

Except, of course, when they were trying to find the hollow earth.  That was fun and games.

And that's all for this week.  See you on Monday, when we'll look at a still-controversial 18th century murder mystery.  In the meantime, here's a song that has been covered by pretty much everyone who ever stepped up to a microphone, but this is probably my favorite version:


6 comments:

  1. Good Heavens, who came up with the bookplate of the cat wearing the impaled-mice necklace??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My guess is, someone with a serious rodent problem.

      Delete
  2. Maybe Columbia should change is' name to Ulthar - I could live there.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The threaded-mice bookplate got me, too.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I read the article on Napoleon's bit of Canada. I'd always wondered why that bump belonged to Louisiana; now I know it's because of the rivers' drainage. It's interesting that by 1818, latitude and longitude could be as strong borders as watersheds used to be.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated. The author of this blog reserves the right to delete remarks from spammers, trolls, idiots, lunatics, jerks, and anyone who happens to annoy me on days when I've gotten out of bed the wrong way. Which is usually any day ending with a "y."